8th Grade Daily English

Daily Homework: Students need to read for thirty minutes each night and bring a signed note, an email, or a text message as evidence of reading the night before.

daily english conventions page

Sentence Structure & Conventions

Standards:

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

  • use capital letters at the right time
  • use apostrophes correctly
  • identify and include nouns and verbs in my sentences, in past/present tense
  • use coordinating conjunctions accurately; use them for more advanced sentences
  • use accurate punctuation in dialogue

Significant Formative Assessments:

  • White board practice
  • Kahoots
  • Practice quiz

Significant Summative Assessments:

  • Engrade

Daily Notes:

  • Mr. Monari’s Group: T, K, and G in the conference room 
  • Mrs. North’s Group: R, C, and S in the balcony office
  • Mr. McAdam’s Group: C, L and S in the classroom 
  • Ms. Menard’s Group: B, B, M, and L in #325 conference room 

Important Documents & Links:

Code Talker by Joseph Bruchach

Standards:

READING: 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.10
By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.1
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.
WRITING:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.A
Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.B
Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.C
Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.E
Establish and maintain a formal style.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.F
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

  • Read Code Talkers with a reading routine and strategy that helps me understand. At this point I need to decide which routines and strategies will help me in high school.
  • Use a note-taking strategy to document the main idea of each chapter.
  • Write an informational essay to explain the theme and significant relationships in the book.

Significant Formative Assessments:

  • Code Talker: Introduction and Chapter One Questions
  • Code Talker: Practice Questions in Engrade
  • Code Talker: Chapter Notes for Main Ideas
  • Domain Vocabulary List
  • Regular Vocabulary List
  • Figurative Language Practice with Code Talkers
  • Essay: Opening Paragraph – first draft
  • Essay: Thesis Statement and Topic Sentences
  • Essay: MLA Format for Book Quotes

Significant Summative Assessments:

  • Summative and Essay – TIMED Final Draft (1 week – in class and as HW)

Daily Notes:

  • Add Daily Notes to ISN (include chapter and page numbers)

Important Documents & Links:

Writing Fiction

Standards:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3.A
Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3.B
Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, and reflection, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3.C
Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another, and show the relationships among experiences and events.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3.D
Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3.E
Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

By the end of this unit, I will be able to write a 3-5 page scene with characters (people in the story).

  • The one main character has a goal, motivation, and conflict.
  • The character goes through rising action and the climax to face the obstacle and solve the problem.
  • My writing will have some dialogue and action.
  • The scene will have a clear setting with time and place.
  • Figurative language will be included to add voice to the story.

Significant Formative Assessments:

  • Elements of Plot – Definitions
  • Rough draft of the scene
  • Dialogue practice from  a video, including when to hit Enter and Tab in a text

Significant Summative Assessments:

  • Elements of Plot – Definitions (Anyone who scores a 3.5 or 4 on the formative is excused from this summative! 🙂)
  • Final draft of scene
  • Punctuation of a scene from a video, focusing on dialogue and paragraph structure (when to hit Enter and Tab in fiction)

Important Documents & Links:

Daily English 8 Revising Fictional Scene

Narrative Rubric Daily English 8

Unit: The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

Independent Reading Standards:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.10
By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.1
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.3
Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

Independent Writing Standards: 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.A
Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.B
Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.C
Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.E
Establish and maintain a formal style.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.F
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

  • Score “Proficient” the Reading Comprehension Test without support, notes, or resources
  • Write a proficient paragraph on all five standards WITH MY OWN notes and resources

Significant Formative Assessments:

  • Individual Student Reading Notes
  • Practice Test Questions
  • Proficient Paragraph Review

Significant Summative Assessments:

  • The Outsiders Test
  • Paragraph about The Outsiders 

Important Documents & Links:

 

Unit: A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park

Standards:

Reading:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.1
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.3
Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
Writing:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3.A
Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3.B
Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, and reflection, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3.C
Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another, and show the relationships among experiences and events.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3.D
Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.3.E
Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

  • Create an accurate timeline to show the plot and sequence of events of two parallel memoirs
  • Select and record the most significant events and lines of dialogue that cause the story to move forward toward a goal
  • Show how the courage of the two protagonists is developed throughout each of their stories
  • Identify elements of plot and show understanding of plot terms and the plots of the story
  • Write a short narrative with one point of view character, including the character’s goal (what they want), motivation (why they want it), and conflict (what obstacle stands in their way).

Significant Formative Assessments:

  • Salva’s timeline and character development
  • Nya’s timeline and character development
  • Plot terms – definitions and application
  • Fiction – dialogue, punctuation, and text structure

Significant Summative Assessments:

  • Plot summative
  • Novel summative
  • Narrative summative

Daily Notes:

Mr. Monari’s Group:

Mrs. North’s Group:

Ms. Menard’s Group:

Monday, November 5th: Read chapters 1-4 and update the timeline for each chapter. Keep two separate timelines, one for Nya and one for Salva. Record both timelines in your ISN.

Tuesday, November 6th: Read chapters 5-8 and continue the notes.

Wednesday, November 7th: Read chapters 9-12 and continue the notes.

Thursday, November 8th: Read chapters 13-16 and continue the notes.

Friday, November 9th: Finish the novel (chapters 17-18) and finish the notes. Return to class for notes and practice with plot elements.

Important Documents & Links:

Unit: Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli

Standards:


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.1

Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.3
Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.6
Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.10
By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

  • comprehend the main ideas and supporting details of the text
  • use textual evidence to show Leo’s progression as a character
  • defend the theme using textual evidence
  • determine what makes a quote significant and explain its importance
  • choose the quote that best shows…

Significant Formative Assessments:

  • Short Constructed Responses using the R.A.C.E.D. strategy for a great answer
  • Reading comprehension checks
  • Thematic paragraph using textual evidence to defend theme and development

Significant Summative Assessments:

  • Character analysis paragraph using textual evidence to defend analysis

Daily Notes and Activities:

  • Monday, August 27th: Read the prologue and first three chapters and write down the two most important events of the chapter. Always answer in complete sentences.
  • Tuesday, August 28th: Continue reading and taking notes on chapters 4-7.
  • Wednesday, August 29th: Read and take notes on chapters 8-9. The exit ticket out the door is an SCR about which character is showing the strongest change so far.
  • Thursday, August 30th: Read and take notes on chapters 10-12. Complete the SCR about what theme the protagonist is learning so far, and include evidence from the text to show exactly how and when the lesson is being learned.
  • Friday, August 31st: Read and take notes on chapters 13-16.
  • Monday, September 3rd: Labor Day, no school
  • Tuesday, September 4th: MAPS testing
  • Wednesday, September 5th: MAPS testing
  • Thursday, September 6th: Continue reading in small groups. Take notes on chapters 17-20 of Stargirl.
  • Friday, September 7th: Read chapters 21-23 of Stargirl. Continue takes notes on the top two main events of each chapter, and explain the significance.
  • Monday, September 10th: AIMS Web Plus testing for reading comprehension, vocabulary, and silent reading fluency
  • Tuesday, September 11th: SCR #1: Which character in Stargirl is the greatest outsider so far, and how the does the character handle the situation? (Break into small groups based on student choice to write about the student body or Stargirl; brainstorm notes together, then draft SCR using RACED strategy.)
  • Wednesday, September 12th: Three groups; one group reading with support, one group reading in pairs with support as needed, and one group reading ahead and drafting paragraph to potentially test out of Daily English early; test out group drafts paragraph about Stargirl as an outsider and works with 100% independence
  • Thursday, September 13th: Three groups; one group reading with support, one group reading in pairs with support as needed, and one group reading ahead and drafting paragraph to potentially test out of Daily English early; test out group drafts paragraph about Stargirl as an outsider and works with 100% independence
  • Friday, September 14th: Three groups; one group reading with support, one group reading in pairs with support as needed, and one group reading ahead and drafting paragraph to potentially test out of Daily English early; test out group drafts paragraph about Stargirl as an outsider and works with 100% independence
  • Monday, September 17th: Group One continues to read Stargirl; Group Two begins drafting paragraph; Group Three brings completed paragraph drafts for “Paragraph Survivor” during class today, which is a self-evaluation before the assessment tomorrow
  • Tuesday, September 18th: Group One is almost done with Stargirl now; Group Two has a second day to draft paragraphs with support as needed (but students need their own notes from their reading days); Group Three makes final corrections on paragraphs before the final draft and formative grade

Paragraph Revisions, Literary Analysis Groups, and Support:

  • Monday, September 24th: Mr. Monari’s group will start drafting the Stargirl paragraph today. Make sure the MLA format is correct: First and last name/Mr. Monari & Ms. Menard/Daily English 8 – Period 7/8/ 24 September 2018/Cool title centered. Mrs. North’s group will finalize paragraphs and revise until all students have a four in all five standards. Ms. Menard’s group will learn about literary analysis and take notes on what it is and how to do it. Students in this group will complete Phase 2 notes (Meaning, Style, Tone) for “The Bet” in their ISN.
  • Tuesday, September 25th: Mr. Monari’s group will continue drafting the paragraph and will focus on getting the paragraph organized in PGBYRRYRYRRPO style today. Mrs. North’s group will finalize paragraphs, and students will join Ms. Menard’s group after Mrs. North and Ms. Menard have both checked the final paragraph. Ms. Menard’s group will complete Phase 3 (Rhetoric, Message, & Argument) in their ISN. Then they will draft a green topic sentence and three yellow main points about the literary analysis of “The Bet.”
  • Wednesday, September 26th: Mr. Monari’s group will continue working on paragraphs and will focus on confirming that all students are advanced in MLA and Organizational standards. Mrs. North’s group will finalize paragraphs or complete them as homework after today. Mrs. North will join Mr. Monari’s group once all of her students’ paragraphs are complete. Ms. Menard’s group will draft the literary analysis paragraph while the students new to the group (who just finished their last paragraph) will take notes on tone, setting, diction, argument, and meaning.
  • Thursday, September 27th: Mr. Monari’s group (with the help of Mrs. North) will continue the paragraphs. Ms. Menard’s group will complete the literary analysis paragraphs and her second group will practice finding tone, setting, diction, argument, and meaning in texts.
  • Friday, September 28th: Mr. Monari’s group (with the help of Mrs. North) needs to finish the Stargirl paragraphs. Students need a three in all standards.
  • ALL PARAGRAPHS ARE DONE NOW. MOVE ON TO THE HOLES UNIT. 

Important Documents & Links:

Unit: Holes by Louis Sachar

Standards:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.1

Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.3
Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.6
Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.10
By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

  • comprehend the main ideas and supporting details of the text
  • use textual evidence to show Stanley’s progression as a character
  • defend the theme using textual evidence
  • determine what makes a quote significant and explain its importance
  • choose the quote that best shows…
  • make textual inferences based on evidence rather than guessing
  • identify figurative language examples in the text
  • explain the cause and effect of plot events
  • identify characters, setting, and sequence of events

Significant Formative Assessments:

  • Cornell Notes with a daily focus (individual notes during reading)
  • Essay using textual evidence to defend theme and development

Significant Summative Assessments:

  • Character analysis essay using textual evidence to defend analysis
  • Reading comprehension test over the novel

Daily Notes:

  • Mr. Monari’s Reading Group: Schaeffer, Tyler, Garrett, Ryan, and Lily
  • Mrs. North’s Reading Group: Brady, Sam, Cam, Linh, Carter, and Alexia
  • Ms. Menard’s Reading Group: Kathryn, Micah, Sofia, Jacob, River, and Brooklyn
  • Working on their own: Micah C. and Ian will read “The Open Boat” instead of Holes.
  • Friday, September 28th: The books are scheduled to arrive on Thursday or Friday. (**Note: If the books arrive late for some unexpected reason, the class will read the short story “All Summer in a Day” instead. The text is ready in the podium in the front of the classroom.)
  • Monday, October 1st: Read chapters 1-9 of Holes, which is from pages 3-47. Students need to take THEIR OWN NOTES on 1) CHARACTERS 2) SETTING and 3) the TIMELINE. NEW: Notes are collected daily and are formative grades (the rubric is below). In addition to reading for 30 minutes a night, students need to finish their Holes reading if they don’t finish in class. (They should be able to finish in class, though.) Anyone who comes to class without the reading or the homework done can get a purple pass for lunch the next day to complete the work.
  • Tuesday, October 2nd: Read chapters 10-19 of Holes, which is from pages 48-87. Today students will take notes on CAUSE and EFFECT. Another way to say that is what happened first, and what happened as a result? Notes will look like this:  CAUSE = Stanley gets accused of stealing the shoes  EFFECT = The judge sends him to Camp Green Lake to learn his lesson.
  • Wednesday, October 3rd: Read chapters 20-29 in class today, which are pages 88-129. Today students will take notes on INFERENCES. An INFERENCE is a logical conclusion that a student can make as a result of textual evidence. It is similar to a hypothesis. Notes will look like this: I can infer that ———- because ———- (include a quote with the MLA citation and page number.
  • Thursday, October 4th: Read chapters 30-39 in class today (pages 130-176). Today students will take notes on FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE, which includes: SIMILE,
  • METAPHOR, ONOMATOPOEIA, HYPERBOLE, PERSONIFICATION, ALLITERATION, ANAPHORA, and SYMBOLISM. 
  • Friday, October 5th: Read chapters 40-50 from pages 177-233 in class today. Students need to take notes on JUSTICE. When was a character WAITING FOR JUSTICE, HOW/WHEN DID THE JUSTICE OCCUR, and WHAT HAPPENS AFTER THE PROBLEMS ARE SOLVED? As always, include quotes with page numbers, and detailed explanations.

Important Documents & Links:

Word Bank

Simile: a comparison of two unlike things using like or as

Metaphor: a comparison of two unlike things without using like or as

Onomatopoeia: a word that is spelled the way it sounds

Understatement: Instead of showing how important a statement is, the speaker makes something important sound like it’s not a big deal; this is the opposite of hyperbole

Hyperbole: an exaggeration that is used on purpose to make a point

Alliteration: the repetition of the same consonant sounds at the beginning of words

Personification: giving human characteristics to a non-human object

Unit: The Giver by Lois Lowry

Standards:

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

Significant Formative Assessments:

Significant Summative Assessments:

Daily Notes:

Important Documents & Links:

 

Unit: Animal Farm by George Orwell

Standards:

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

Significant Formative Assessments:

Significant Summative Assessments:

Daily Notes:

Important Documents & Links:

 

Unit: Night by Elie Wiesel

Reading Standards:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.1
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.3
Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.7
Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.10
By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Writing Standards (Argument Essay): 
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1
Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.A
Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.B
Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.C
Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.D
Establish and maintain a formal style.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.E
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

  • Write an argument essay and proficiently use:
    • claim
    • counterclaim
    • concession
    • rebuttal
    • ethos
    • logos
    • pathos
    • evidence

Significant Formative Assessments:

  • Short Constructed Responses to defend an argument/quote
  • Night timeline notes
  • Rough draft of essay

Significant Summative Assessments:

  • Final draft of essay

Daily Notes:

  • Timeline notes

Important Documents & Links:

Writing a Paragraph

Standards:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.A
Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.B
Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.C
Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.E
Establish and maintain a formal style.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.F
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

  • Write a paragraph in GYRPO format (with support during first semester and on my own during second semester)
  • Explain the parts of a paragraph and the purpose of each part

    • Pink Hook: It’s always about the TOPIC, never about the TEXT
    • BLUE TAGS/BK: Title, Author, Genre, Summary of story; and additional sentences as needed to introduce the topic and connect to the thesis
    • GREEN THESIS STATEMENT: Restate the prompt and include your position and domain vocabulary from the prompt and topic.
    • YELLOW MAIN POINT & TRANSITION: State the first point and include an embedded transition that is beyond the basic options.
    • RED QUOTE: Select the best quote and include a LEAD-IN or a LEAD-OUT from the quote. Don’t just dump the quote as a stand-alone sentence.
    • RED EXPLAIN: Analyze the quote. DO NOT simply tell what the quote is about. Do not say something like, “This quote means” or “This quote shows…” Instead, include ANALYSIS, EVALUATION, or SYNTHESIS. How can you do this? Remember the strategies: X>Y, X causes Y, X + Y = Z, predictions, analysis
    • Repeat the YELLOWRED-RED pattern for a second point.
    • Repeat the YELLOWRED-RED pattern for a third point.
    • GREEN CONCLUSION: Wrap up the paragraph with a sentence that matches the hook and thesis. Avoid cheesy lines like, “And these are the reasons why…”
    • PURPLE VOCABULARY: Underline domain words (expert words from the text) and put regular vocabulary words in bold (cool words, like synonyms)
    • ORANGE LIKE THE SUN/FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE: Include about 2-4 examples of figurative language, but avoid the cheesy ones.
      • simile
      • metaphor
      • personification
      • oxymoron
      • allusion
      • alliteration
      • hyperbole
      • understatement
      • anaphora

Significant Formative Assessments:

  • Rough draft
  • Sentence outline
  • vocabulary
  • writing standards

Significant Summative Assessments:

  • Final draft of typed paragraph

Daily Notes:

  • Paragraph Rubric in your ISN

Important Documents & Links:

 

Writing an Essay

Standards:

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.A
Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.B
Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.C
Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.E
Establish and maintain a formal style.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2.F
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.8.1.B
Form and use verbs in the active and passive voice.

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

  • Write a five paragraph essay on my own, but with resources:
    • in five days during first semester
    • in three days during second semester
    • in one day during April and May (when practicing timed essays)

Significant Formative Assessments:

  • Rough drafts

Significant Summative Assessments:

  • Final drafts

Daily Notes:

  • See paragraph section for reminders about paragraph structure
  • Use the essay map sheet as a reference guide

Important Documents & Links:

 

 

Vocabulary Practice

Standards:

By the end of this unit, I will be able to:

Significant Formative Assessments:

Significant Summative Assessments:

Daily Notes:

Important Documents & Links:

 

Class Supplies – Needed Daily

Three ring binder, just for this class

Loose leaf paper, just for this class

A pencil

A pen

Highlighters – pink, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple

A place to save your work – flashdrive, Google Drive, server folder

 

Class Behavior Agreements

Working in groups:

Working one-on-one:

Working on my own:

Breaks:

Work habits:

 

Habits of Strong Readers:

Come back later:

 

Habits of Strong Writers:

Come back later: