8th Grade English

Animal Farm by George Orwell

Unit Overview

  • Feb. 21st and 22nd : Read chapters 1-2 in class while completing the active reading strategy and Sketch-to-Stretch. Homework will be to read chapters 3-4 and complete the correlating Reading Questions for those chapters.
  • Feb 25th and 26th : Read chapters 5-6 in class while completing the active reading strategy and drafting your RACED paragraph. Homework will be to read chapter 7, complete the correlating Reading Questions, and finish your rough draft of the formative RACED paragraph.
  • Feb 27th and 28th : Read chapters 8-9 in class, complete the active reading strategy, the plot versus theme exercise, and  revise your RACED paragraph after feedback. Homework will be to read chapter 10, finish the guided reading questions, and compile your notes for the summative on the final day of the unit. I’ll also be checking to see if you have completed your portfolios by the end of class.
  • March 1st and 4th : As class begins, I’ll collect your Active Reading Questions and we’ll begin the summative. You’re allowed all of class to work on the summative, but if you finish early, work on your fiction story for the next unit.

Formative Drafting Prompts

For Period 1 – Hey everyone, this is a real quick edit and shift, but don’t worry about doing the formative drafts for homework. I feel as though I didn’t explain it very well and would be remiss to task you all with something poorly explained. We’ll spend more class time on this. My apologies if you have completed this assignment already or don’t see this message, but at least you’ll be ahead.

-Mr. McAdam

1.   In chapter five, Napoleon finally makes his move to remove Snowball from leadership and assume direct control over the farm. Is this a surprising turn of events or could his treachery have been predicted?

2.   Even though the reader is made aware that Jones has fled to some other part of the country, the animals still fear that he may return. The pigs are quick to use this as the ultimate reason for convincing the animals that their leadership stops this from happening. Why do the animals still fear the return of Jones even as they are mistreated under the pig’s leadership?

Standards

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.3
    Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.1
    Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.2
    Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2
    Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

Night by Elie Wiesel

Helpful Documents:

Night Works Cited & Guidelines

 

Reading Standards:

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.1
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.3
Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.5
Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.6
Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.8.7
Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

 

Writing Standards:

Text Types and Purposes:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1
Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.A
Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.B
Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.C
Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.D
Establish and maintain a formal style.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1.E
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
By the end of this unit, I will be able to:
  • Listen to Night and record significant events/people/concepts/relationships in timeline notes (with chapter and page number)
  • Analyze points of view in nonfiction texts regarding the Holocaust:
    • “Wiesel Warns Against Indifference, Injustice” by Mary O’Leary
    • Elie Wiesel’s Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech
  • Write a TIMED argument essay that incorporates evidence from all three sources
  • Finish the essay as HW if not complete in one day of class
  • Meet deadlines with proficient or advanced work
  • Advocate for additional support in ELO before the deadline as needed

Twelfth Night Unit

Act One: You need one note card per question.

  • 1.1 The rules of courtly love are demonstrated in Act 1, Scene 1 of Twelfth Night. Provide two examples to show how both Duke Orsino and Lady Olivia demonstrate the social norms of courtly love in 1.1.
  • 1.2 What is Viola’s motive to disguise herself as Orsino’s eunuch?
  • 1.2 How are Olivia and Viola foil characters?
  • 1.3 (Regular English): Who is the second suitor for Lady Olivia, and why does Toby encourage this?
  • 1.3 (Honors English): How is Toby manipulating his position as Olivia’s uncle?
  • 1.4 (Regular English): What instructions does Duke give Cesario, and why does he believe Cesario is the right man for the job?
  • 1.4 (Honors English): How does Orsino succeed and fail at courtly love in 1.4?
  • 1.5 (Both Honors & Regular): What are the major events in 1.5, and what happens in each event?
    • “Take the fool away” (pages 10-11)
    • Malvolio’s jealousy (pages 11-12)
    • Maria reports about a messenger at the gate, and, it gets worse, Toby met him? (pages 12-13)
    • What kind of man is Cesario? (p. 13)
    • Cesario’s message and Olivia’s response (p. 14-17)
    • Foil characters (p. 16-17)

Act Two: Write the answers in your book. 

Act Three: 

  • Formative Assessment: Reading Comprehension, defended with evidence
  • Practice Assessment: Using citations to navigate the scene and defend answers
  • Practice Assessment: MLA Formatting for in-text citation and Works Cited page
  • Guided Reading Questions Act 3, Scenes 1-3

Act Four: 

Act Five

  • Summative Assessment: Reading Comprehension
  • Summative Assessment: Analysis of Text with Evidence
  • Summative Assessment: MLA Format for Works Cited Entry

 

Monday, November 26th 

Objective

  • Students will begin reading Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare.
  • They will demonstrate an understanding of the background knowledge of Shakespeare, the Globe Theater, and the context of the play.

Agenda

  • New Seating Chart
  • All students have a copy of the play. Students should write their names in the text and take all notes on the text or in their ISN. The Dover edition of the text is for students to keep.
  • Background Knowledge
  • The Globe Theater
  • Courtly Love
  • Twelfth Night – Context & Characters

Success Criteria

  • Act 1, Scene 1 (Shakespeare 1.1)
  • Courtly Love – notes and examples in 1.1
  • Short Constructed Response on an index card: The rules of courtly love are demonstrated in Act 1, Scene 1 of William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. Provide two examples to show how both Duke Orsino and Lady Olivia are demonstrating the social norms of courtly love in 1.1.

Homework

  • Read Act 1, Scene 2 (Shakespeare 1.2) and paraphrase the text in your book.
  • Create a flow chart on an index card to show Lady Viola’s plan and logic. Include quotes in your flow chart to defend your translation and interpretation of the text. Don’t forget to write your name on your index card before you turn it in at the beginning of the next class.

Monday, November 19th

Objective:

Students will build a reading routine for life. 🙂

Agenda:

Bring a favorite book to read in class.

Success Criteria:

It was a great day if students lose track of time because the story is so good.

Homework: None. Happy Thanksgiving Break! 🙂

Thursday, November 15th 

Objective: 

Students will demonstrate mastery of the TPCASTT strategy to find the theme of a poem.

Agenda: 

Poetry summative

Success Criteria: 

TPCASTT rubric

Homework: 

None

WORKS CITED PAGE: Works Cited Poetry & Leadership 11.14.18

Wednesday, Nov. 7th – Tuesday, Nov. 13th

Objective:

Students will write an essay to show their skill with poetry analysis and informational writing.

Agenda:

There will be work time on these three days for students to:

  1. Review essay structure
  2. Plan the introduction paragraph
  3. Plan the conclusion paragraph
  4. Briefly outline the three body paragraphs
  5. Review possible domain and regular vocabulary words
  6. Brainstorm figurative language options that don’t sound cheesy…seriously
  7. Practice writing in present tense
  8. Practice removing most state of being verbs from the final draft
  9. Writing in third person
  10. Creating a Works Cited page and using accurate MLA format for poetry

Success Criteria:

Students will add the essay rubric to their ISN for future reference on all essays.

Homework:

The complete and final draft of the essay is due–PRINTED–by Thursday, November 15th by 2:45 in ELO. This is a non-negotiable deadline. 

Friday, October 26th- Monday, Nov. 5th 

Objective: 

Students will use the TPCASTT strategy to find the theme of a poem.

T = Read the title and record your first impressions.

P = Paraphrase each line.

C = Mark the emotional connotations and figurative language.

A = In a complete sentence, write the speaker’s attitude of the poem.

S = Draw a line to show the shift(s) in the poem, and add an explanation.

T = Revisit the title. Has your impression changed?

T = Based on the evidence, write a theme statement about the human condition.

Agenda: 

Students will have time in class to TPCASTT the poems in the poetry packet. Extra copies of the packet are available on the counter in the classroom if needed.

Class time will be spent reading and TPCASTTing the poems for the next few days.

Success Criteria:

The TPCASTT rubric is in the poetry packet. Students will submit their best three TPCASTTed poems for a formative grade. A summative TPCASTT will be given after practice with the formative poems.

Homework:

All poems need to be TPCASTTed by the end of class on Tuesday, November 6th.

Wednesday, October 24th

Students will paraphrase the direct translation of Henry V’s St. Crispin’s Day speech based on inferences and textual evidence.

Agenda:

  1. Read the speech  2) View the speech  3) Paraphrase the speech
  2. Here’s the link to the speech: St. Crispin’s Day Speech

Success Criteria:

This is a formative assessment for paraphrasing. The paraphrase section of the TPCASTT strategy rubric will be used.

Homework:

Nothing is due today.

The final paraphrase of the speech is due next class if students don’t finish it today.

Monday, October 22nd

Objective:

Students can read a novel of choice for an extended period of time. They can build reading endurance to read on their own.

Agenda:

Reading time in class today (bring or borrow a book of your choice)

Success Criteria:

Read.  Enjoy the story. No handouts. No assessments. Just reading time for the fun of it.

Homework:

The final draft of “The Open Boat” paragraph is due today. Turn in a printed copy of the paragraph. Print in ELO if necessary.

**Today there is a modified schedule for the Talent Show.

Tuesday, October 8th  

Based on our class plan and student requests, our UPDATED, NEW PLAN is listed below:

Objective:

Today students will come to class having read “The Open Boat” (without annotating) and with a a completed Four Square Notes Chart. The notes include three examples of textual evidence in each of the four categories:

How do textual INFERENCES show a tragic ending?

  • Example:
  • Example:
  • Example:

How does SYMBOLISM foreshadow a tragic ending? 

  • Example:
  • Example:
  • Example:

Where is there IRONY in the story? (There are three types of irony: VERBAL IRONY, SITUATIONAL IRONY, and DRAMATIC IRONY.) Note: You don’t need one of each type of irony. Just find three examples of irony in the story. 

  • Example:
  • Example:
  • Example:

How is the SETTING PERSONIFIED as the ANTAGONIST? 

  • Example:
  • Example:
  • Example:

 

Updated: The summative prompt for the paragraph (later) will be the four questions listed on the notes page.

Agenda:

You should already have a copy of the story, but extra copies are on the counter if you were absent last time. 

Set the mood with this soothing, calming soundtrack that matches the opening of the story. (Hmm…story opening? I wonder if that matters in literary analysis.)

Set the tone and mood for “The Open Boat”

 

Homework:

DUE NOW: None 🙂

DUE NEXT TIME: Finish reading “The Open Boat” as homework, but do not annotate the text during reading. Instead, complete the Four Square Notes with three answers in each box, including textual evidence and page numbers.

DUE NEXT TIME: If you haven’t turned in a printed copy of your “Bet” paragraph, bring the printed copy next class for a class revision workshop.

Friday, October 5th 

Objective:

Today you will continue reading the short story, “The Open Boat” by Stephen Crane. This time you will complete the literary analysis of the text and write a summative paragraph based on the prompt below:

The summative prompt for the paragraph (later) will be: Analyze the effectiveness of the irony, inferences, and symbolism in “The Open Boat,” and evaluate how each one adds to the tone, mood, or message of the story. 

Agenda:

You should already have a copy of the story, but extra copies are on the counter if you were absent last time. 

Set the mood with this soothing, calming soundtrack that matches the opening of the story. (Hmm…story opening? I wonder if that matters in literary analysis.)

Set the tone and mood for “The Open Boat”

Read the story together in class. Complete the literary analysis as a class while you read. It’s your story, your analysis, so you decide which notes to take as you read.

Success Criteria:

I can make my own choices about taking notes during reading. My purpose for reading is to take notes for a literary analysis of “The Open Boat.”

Domain Vocabulary:

Same – all terms from literary analysis (on the literary analysis page with the 3 Phases)

Homework:

DUE NOW: None. 

DUE NEXT TIME: No homework 🙂


Wednesday, October 3rd

Class Leaders Today: Period 1 – Wyatt M. 

Objective:

Today you will read the next short story, “The Open Boat” by Stephen Crane. This time you will complete the literary analysis of the text and write a summative paragraph based on the same prompt as last time.

The summative prompt for the paragraph (later) will be: Analyze the effectiveness of the irony, inferences, and symbolism in “The Open Boat,” and evaluate how each one adds to the tone, mood, or message of the story. 

Agenda:

Pick up a copy of the story from the counter.

Set the mood with this soothing, calming soundtrack that matches the opening of the story. (Hmm…story opening? I wonder if that matters in literary analysis.)

Set the tone and mood for “The Open Boat”

Read the story together in class. Complete the literary analysis as a class while you read. It’s your story, your analysis, so you decide which notes to take as you read.

Success Criteria:

I can make my own choices about taking notes during reading. My purpose for reading is to take notes for a literary analysis of “The Open Boat.”

Domain Vocabulary:

Same – all terms from literary analysis (on the literary analysis page with the 3 Phases)

Homework:

DUE NOW: Printed copy of your literary analysis of “The Bet” (formative grade)

DUE NOW: FINAL DRAFT, PRINTED COPY OF YOUR BET PARAGRAPH

Monday, October 1st 

Class Leaders Today: Period 1 – Janie and Saje

Objective:

Today you will work on your own or in pairs (if you ask for permission) to revise your paragraph about “The Bet.” The room will be quiet for everyone to have writing and revising time. Students who are off task will finish revising on their own.

Agenda:

Get out your laptops and write. Remember what an effective work day looks like and sounds like. Students need to stay in their seats and work on their own revisions. If someone has evidence of a proficient paragraph, then they may work with a partner to revise.

Success Criteria:

I can score proficient or advanced on all five standards in my paragraph.

Domain Vocabulary:

No new vocabulary today.

Homework:

DUE NOW: Access to your paragraph (either printed or online) for revisions

DUE NEXT TIME: FINAL DRAFT, PRINTED COPY OF YOUR BET PARAGRAPH

Thursday, September 27th 

Objective:

Today is a writing workshop for my literary analysis paragraph of “The Bet.” The goal is to get Blackout BINGO and have evidence of an advanced paragraph in all five standards.

Agenda:

There will NOT be time to print. Come prepared. Part of your homework and work habits is to bring a printed copy of your paragraph to class. You have two days to making printing arrangements during ELO, before school, after school, or at home.

Class will be mostly student-led today:

Class Leader Today:

Standard 1/Ideas & Content (the red explains)  review will be led by:

Standard 2/Organization (PGBYRRYRRYRRBPPPO + transitions) review will be led by:

Standard 3/Voice & Vocab (30 domain, 30 regular, 3-4 FL, no “You”) review will be led by:

Standard 4/Conventions (present tense, punctuation, capitalization, some advanced sentence structure, and two state of being verbs or fewer – is, be, am, are, was, were, been, has, have, had, do, does, did, can, could, shall, should, will, would, may, might, must, being – solutions – replace verb , YODA the order, or delete the “is” in front of the action verb when possible) review will be led by:

Standard 5: MLA Format (heading, title, TNR, 12, 1 inch, “Short Stories” “Q” (Chekov 33).) review will be led by:

Success Criteria:

  1. The paragraph rubric
  2. My answer is about the prompt and not just about the story
  3. Friendly Reminder: I have a three purple pages in my ISN to remind me how to score proficient or advanced on the five standards.

Domain Vocabulary:

No new vocabulary today.

Homework:

DUE NOW: Printed copy of your literary analysis of “The Bet”

DUE NEXT TIME: Final, printed copy of “The Bet” 

According to student responses, you should look for these things when you do a literary analysis of a text: 

  • weird things happening

  • clues

  • foreshadowing

  • break down the text to understand

  • investigate the text

  • study how vocabulary shapes the story

  • check for repetition – it matters

  • describe the tone

  • key words to find the tone, key words like domain vocabulary

  • explain what you read

  • notice the details

  • find figurative language and see how the author used it

  • use a strategy to find regular and domain vocab in the text

  • slow down to understand the text better

  • learn from the characters

  • connect to the world, human condition, how we can all learn from the characters

Tuesday, September 25th 

Objective:

I can plan and draft a proficient or advanced paragraph, in GYRPO format, by the end of class today. All of my notes, evidence, and best thinking are already highlighted and recorded, so I can write this paragraph from start to finish in one class period.

OPTIONAL HOMEWORK–I come to class with my paragraph drafted EARLY so Ms. Menard can review it in class on Thursday.

Agenda:

Study the prompt and make sure I know what is expected

Time to discuss HOW to answer the prompt, helpful hints, models of excellent writing

Time to draft on my own (headphones are allowed for your own music)

Success Criteria:

The literary analysis prompt is on the counter, along with the GYRPO paragraph rubric. Add this to your ISN or three ring binder.

Domain Vocabulary:

No new vocabulary today.

Homework:

OPTIONAL HOMEWORK–I come to class with my paragraph drafted EARLY so Ms. Menard can review it in class on Thursday.

DUE NEXT TIME: Complete, PRINTED paragraph with literary analysis of “The Bet” (There will not be time to print in class. Come prepared with your printed copy. Ms. Menard will let you print during ELO before this class.)

 

 

Friday, September 21st

No school for students: Teacher Collaboration Day

Thursday, September 20th

(extra time given from last class)

Objective:

I can use the three phases of literary analysis (plot, style, and rhetoric) to evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s text message and design of “The Bet” by Anton Chekov.

Agenda:

Read “The Bet” and discuss significant elements along the way. Mark the text with notes and annotations to support textual analysis. After reading, complete a literary analysis using the same three phases format in your ISN.

Success Criteria:

The literary analysis rubric is on the counter. Please tape a copy into your ISN.

Domain Vocabulary:

Human condition (included in Phase 3)

Connotation (included in Phase 2)

 

Homework:

DUE NEXT TIME: Extended analysis of “The Bet”

 

Tuesday, September 18th

Objective:

I can use the three phases of literary analysis (plot, style, and rhetoric) to evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s text message and design of “The Bet” by Anton Chekov.

Agenda:

Read “The Bet” and discuss significant elements along the way. Mark the text with notes and annotations to support textual analysis. After reading, complete a literary analysis using the same three phases format in your ISN.

Success Criteria:

The literary analysis rubric is on the counter. Please tape a copy into your ISN.

Domain Vocabulary:

Human condition (included in Phase 3)

Connotation (included in Phase 2)

 

Homework:

DUE NOW: Extended analysis  with all three phases completed in your ISN

DUE NEXT TIME: Extended analysis of “The Bet”

 

Friday, September 14th

Objective:

I can use the three phases of literary analysis (plot, style, and rhetoric) to evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s text message and design.

Agenda:

Last class we used six elements included in literary analysis: tone, style, mood, character, diction, and syntax. Now we will take those elements deeper with the three phases, or the PROCESS for literary analysis.

  1. Check Homework: Analysis of Holes passage
  2. Review six elements of analysis
  3. Notes for three phases of analysis
  4. Work time in small groups – analyze either the passage from Island of the Blue Dolphins or from Holes
  5. Where are we headed next class? Analysis of “The Bet”.

Success Criteria:

All three steps are complete and each member of the group feels comfortable completing the three phases of analysis. This is a non-graded formative to practice analysis one more time before the next formative is graded.

Domain Vocabulary:

Human condition (included in Phase 3)

Connotation (included in Phase 2)

 

Homework:

DUE NOW: Analysis of Holes (the six elements)

DUE NEXT TIME: Extended analysis of either passage with all three phases completed in your ISN

Tuesday, August 28th

Objective:

I can identify action/doing verbs, state of being/helping verbs, and the complete verbs in a sentence.

I can demonstrate my understanding of figurative language by creating a poem to express the mood, tone, and context of an historical photograph, but I can use and accurately label figurative language in my writing.

Agenda:

Two minute interviews continue

Mustang 101: Kinard expectations for ELO (in all classes) and Media Center/Technology expectations

Practice with verbs (Pre-test, then practice in class and learn a few tricks, then more practice, followed by two mini formative assessments that are due next class)

Explain figurative language poem assignment and go over documents: 1) assignment 2) grading rubric 3) model of an advanced poem

Work time to practice and get help if needed; ELO passes are available if requested

Success Criteria:

Verbs practice rubric

Figurative language voice poem rubric

Model of advanced work

Domain Vocabulary:

Types of verbs defined on handouts

Figurative language terms defined and modeled on assignment and model poem

Homework:

DUE NOW: The grit and prudence notecard

DUE on Thursday, August 30th: Verbs formative half sheets (2 pages)

DUE on Tuesday, September 4th: Final draft of voice poem

Important Documents & Links:

 

Friday, August 24th

Objective:

I know, understand, and can use GYRPO writing format (green, blue, yellow, red, red, etc.) for a paragraph.

Agenda:

Turn in your two-minute interview index card.

Turn in your printed paragraph pre-test with the green rubric stapled to it.

Practice the HW in class: Grit & Prudence Index Card (Draw picture on one side, include the abstract equation, translate the abstract equation, include a description with TWO specific details about how grit and prudence apply to 1) English class and 2) life in general/a goal. Specific details could be about WHEN it is difficult to push through an I-don’t-feel-like-working mood, managing a tight schedule, or remembering to keep working because a person has a dream to one day _______.

GYPRO Writing Format: Add the domain vocabulary list to your notebook, along with the paragraph rubric and the model of an advanced paragraph (about the PIXAR short film, “For the Birds”). Highlight and label the parts of the paragraph to show WHAT is included, WHY it is advanced, and HOW to design your own strong writing.

Success Criteria:

Paragraph included in notebook

Model of an advanced paragraph in notebook (Title: “Next Time, Try Kindness”)

Domain Vocabulary:

See the domain vocabulary handout for the paragraph vocab words

Important Documents & Links:

 

Wednesday, August 22nd

Objectives:

I will know all the members of class and participate in the community.

I will also be able to write a proficient paragraph for a paragraph pre-test.

Agenda:

Welcome and introductions

Class expectations and supplies

Two Minute Student Interviews

Paragraph Pre-test about “The Last Great Race on Earth”

Success Criteria:

I can name each person in class by mid-September.

I can score proficient or advanced on the paragraph rubric.

Domain Vocabulary:

Proficient: Work demonstrates grade level expectations

Advanced: Work demonstrates the grade level standard and beyond

Class Agreements:

The 6 P’s: Polite, Prompt, Productive, Participate, Positive Mental Attitude, Prepared, and Polite

Important Documents and Links:

Complete the index card for the two-minute interview.

The printed paragraph pre-test is due at the beginning of the next class.